Autism Spectrum Disorder and Remote Learning: Parents’ Perspectives on Their Child’s Learning at Home

This review journal Autism Spectrum Disorder and Remote Learning: Parents’ Perspectives on Their Child’s Learning at Home. This descriptive study explores parents’ perspectives on their child’s experience with remote learning in the context of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). With the COVID-19 pandemic necessitating a shift to remote education, it is crucial to understand how children with ASD are adapting to this new learning environment. Through qualitative interviews with parents, this study aims to gain insights into the challenges, successes, and overall impact of remote learning on children with ASD. The findings provide valuable information to educators, policymakers, and parents to better support the educational needs of children with ASD during times of remote learning.

Introduction:

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a significant transformation in the education system, with remote learning becoming the new norm for students worldwide. However, for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), the transition to remote learning presents unique challenges. Understanding the perspectives of parents is vital in identifying the factors that impact their child’s learning experience at home. This descriptive study seeks to explore parents’ perspectives on their child’s remote learning journey, highlighting the challenges faced and the successes achieved in providing effective education to children with ASD in a remote setting.

Methodology:

Qualitative interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of parents of children with ASD who had experienced remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. The participants were recruited through ASD support groups and educational networks. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to gather detailed information about the child’s remote learning experience, including challenges, successes, and overall impact on their educational progress. Thematic analysis was employed to identify common themes and patterns in the data.

Results:

The study included a diverse group of parents who shared their perspectives on their child’s remote learning journey. The findings revealed several key themes related to the challenges and successes of remote learning for children with ASD.

Firstly, parents highlighted the significant challenge of maintaining their child’s focus and attention during remote learning sessions. The absence of in-person support and the potential for sensory distractions at home made it difficult for children with ASD to engage effectively with remote learning materials. Parents expressed the need for specialized strategies and individualized support to enhance their child’s focus and participation.

Secondly, social interaction and peer engagement emerged as crucial elements lacking in remote learning environments. Children with ASD often struggle with social communication, and the remote setting further limited opportunities for social interaction with peers. Parents emphasized the importance of incorporating interactive activities and virtual platforms that facilitate social engagement to foster social skills development.

Thirdly, parents highlighted the importance of clear and consistent communication between educators and families. Regular communication, including updates on schedules, assignments, and progress, was deemed essential in ensuring that parents could effectively support their child’s learning at home. Parents expressed the need for collaborative partnerships with educators to address individual needs and make necessary adaptations to remote learning materials and strategies.

Despite the challenges, parents also identified some successes and positive outcomes of remote learning for their child with ASD. They reported that the flexible learning environment provided opportunities for personalized pacing, tailored instruction, and reduced anxiety related to the school environment. Some children demonstrated increased independence and self-regulation skills, as they had more control over their learning environment and routine.

Conclusion:

This descriptive study sheds light on the perspectives of parents regarding their child’s experience with remote learning in the context of Autism Spectrum Disorder. The findings highlight the challenges faced by children with ASD and their families in adapting to remote learning, particularly related to maintaining focus, social interaction, and communication. The study also identifies the potential benefits and positive outcomes of remote learning for children with ASD. The insights gained from this study can inform educators, policymakers, and parents in developing effective strategies and supports to optimize remote learning experiences for children with ASD. By addressing the identified challenges and capitalizing on the successes, we can enhance the educational outcomes and well-being of children with ASD during times of remote learning.

Open Access Journal Scopus, Analyzing the Implementation of a Digital Twin Manufacturing System: Using a Systems Thinking Approach | Full Text in MDPI Publisher of Open Acces Journal.

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